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Gen Z: The Tik Tok Generation Who Care About Ending Racism & Climate Change

By: McCrindle

The world which educators are preparing students for is changing, but so too is the world these students are being shaped in.

From the earliest of ages students are living a digitally integrated lifestyle, with a focus on personalisation and customisation. They are a mobile, social, visual, digital and global generation. So digitally integrated are they, that Generation Alpha (born 2010- 2024) are expected to be the pioneers of translating the metaverse into everyday life (81%).

Racism and Climate Change are What Gen Z Care About

Generation Z is not only a digitally savvy generation, but one that cares about social good, even more so than their older counterparts. The top global issues for today’s students are ending racism (83%), reducing climate change (79%), social equality (78%) and alleviating poverty (78%).

Students Turn to Tik Tok to Learn New Skills

The platforms students are using to teach themselves new skills are reflective of an increasingly digitally integrated lifestyle. While teachers top the list with 50% of students engaging with teachers at least daily to teach themselves new skills, this is closely followed by websites (48%). The influence of peers and social media in shaping the students of today is significant with TikTok (42%) the third most engaged with platform by students to teach themselves new skills, coming in above parents (39%).

The Benefits and Challenges of the Great Screen Age

The platforms students are using to teach themselves new skills are reflective of an increasingly digitally integrated lifestyle. The influence of peers and social media in shaping the students of today is significant with TikTok the third most engaged with platform by students to teach themselves new skills. The short videos on Tik Tok provide an efficient way for this generation to upskill themselves. It is the sentiment of “why read it when I can watch it?”

Although the platform of Tik Tok and others like it provide Gen Z with a convenient way of upskilling themselves, it does highlight the need for parents and educators to be instilling in this generation an appreciation for deep learning and to question what they learn online. In a world of user generated content where anyone can go viral, there is merit in reminding this generation to be cautious with their online activity, and to question the validity of the things they read (or rather watch) online. EFF-2022_infographic-mocku

Equipping Students for the New World of Work

Download the latest infographic with all the insights on preparing students for the new world of work and their expectations for the future workforce


Article supplied with thanks to McCrindle.

About the Author: McCrindle are a team of researchers and communications specialists who discover insights, and tell the story of Australians – what we do, and who we are.

Feature image: Photo by Shingi Rice on Unsplash  

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